An analysis of folly and ignorance displayed by various famous writers

The latter part of the eighteenth century is often in English-speaking countries, of course called, simply, the Age of Johnson.

An analysis of folly and ignorance displayed by various famous writers

Table of Contents Summary Plato's The Apology is an account of the speech Socrates makes at the trial in which he is charged with not recognizing the gods recognized by the state, inventing new deities, and corrupting the youth of Athens. Socrates' speech, however, is by no means an "apology" in our modern understanding of the word.

The name of the dialogue derives from the Greek "apologia," which translates as a defense, or a speech made in defense. Thus, in The Apology, Socrates attempts to defend himself and his conduct--certainly not to apologize for it. For the most part, Socrates speaks in a very plain, conversational manner.

He explains that he has no experience with the law courts and that he will instead speak in the manner to which he is accustomed: He explains that his behavior stems from a prophecy by the oracle at Delphi which claimed that he was the wisest of all men.

Recognizing his ignorance in most worldly affairs, Socrates concluded that he must be wiser than other men only in that he knows that he knows nothing. In order to spread this peculiar wisdom, Socrates explains that he considered it his duty to question supposed "wise" men and to expose their false wisdom as ignorance.

These activities earned him much admiration amongst the youth of Athens, but much hatred and anger from the people he embarrassed. He cites their contempt as the reason for his being put on trial. Socrates then proceeds to interrogate Meletus, the man primarily responsible for bringing Socrates before the jury.

This is the only instance in The Apology of the elenchus, or cross-examination, which is so central to most Platonic dialogues. His conversation with Meletus, however, is a poor example of this method, as it seems more directed toward embarrassing Meletus than toward arriving at the truth.

In a famous passage, Socrates likens himself to a gadfly stinging the lazy horse which is the Athenian state. Without him, Socrates claims, the state is liable to drift into a deep sleep, but through his influence--irritating as it may be to some--it can be wakened into productive and virtuous action.

Socrates is found guilty by a narrow margin and is asked to propose a penalty. Socrates jokingly suggests that if he were to get what he deserves, he should be honored with a great meal for being of such service to the state.

On a more serious note, he rejects prison and exile, offering perhaps instead to pay a fine.

An analysis of folly and ignorance displayed by various famous writers

When the jury rejects his suggestion and sentences him to death, Socrates stoically accepts the verdict with the observation that no one but the gods know what happens after death and so it would be foolish to fear what one does not know.

He also warns the jurymen who voted against him that in silencing their critic rather than listening to him, they have harmed themselves much more than they have harmed him.The theme that best develops this illustration is the discussion of fools and their foolishness.

This discussion allows Shakespeare not only to portray human nature, but also to elicit a sort of Socratic introspection into the nature of society’s own ignorance as well. One type of fool that Shakespeare involves in King Lear is the immoral fool. In Gray's MS. at Pembroke College, the title of this poem is, Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College, Windsor, and the adjacent Country.

The motto from Menander and the notes were added in - Ed.]" The Works of Thomas Gray: In Prose and Verse. Ed. by Edmund Gosse, in four vols. London: MacMillan and Co., , vol.

i, and "What are inspirational analysis quotes?" This list includes notable analysis quotes by various authors, writers, playwrights, speakers, politicians, athletes, poets, and more.

Vote on your favorites so that the greatest analysis quotes rise to the top, as the order of the list changes dynamically based on votes. This is the only instance in The Apology of the elenchus, or cross-examination, which is so central to most Platonic dialogues.

His conversation with Meletus, however, is a poor example of this method, as it seems more directed toward embarrassing Meletus than toward arriving at the truth.

Next only to William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson is perhaps the most quoted of English writers. The latter part of the eighteenth century is often (in English-speaking countries, of .

b. In his book, Praise of Folly, he ridiculed superstition, prejudice, upper class priveledges, and Church abuses.

c.

An analysis of folly and ignorance displayed by various famous writers

By satirizing social evils, Erasmus encouraged people to think about reforms. 4. Sir Thomas More () * An Englishman, he wrote Utopia, a book about an ideal country that was free from war, injustice, poverty, and ignorance.

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